You Can Stop Overdose Death!

These trainings are designed for anyone who thinks they may be near someone experiencing an overdose. Baltimore City community members are encouraged to attend public trainings to learn how to recognize and respond to an opioid overdose. This workshop is brought to you by the Baltimore Harm Reduction Coalition.

Location
ImpactHub
Instructor
Baltimore Harm Reduction Coalition
Part of
June Workshops
Sessions
Thursday, August 24, 2017 6:30 - 7:30 PM
 
 

BHRC’s Overdose Education and Naloxone Distribution (OEND) program is authorized by the Maryland Department of Health & Mental Hygiene (DHMH) to provide free opioid overdose response trainings to potential witnesses of opioid-related overdose in Maryland. BHRC was the first program outside of the Baltimore City Health Department to provide naloxone to bystanders in Baltimore. Since 2014, BSHRC has trained over 300 people in Baltimore city and in three Maryland counties.

The one-hour OEND training focuses on recognizing an opioid overdose (e.g. from heroin, fentanyl, oxycodone) and administering naloxone (also known as Narcan), a life-saving medication that reverses opioid overdose.Participants are offered a free Naloxone prescription and kit as well as a certificate of completion at the end of each training.The training also provides background on opioids, the policy landscape in Maryland, legal rights and harm reduction.Each training is tailored for the audience and setting. Our target audiences have included parents and peers of people who use opioids.

Naloxone is a prescription medicine that can reverse an opioid overdose. It is given by nasal spray or injection to a person having an overdose. Naloxone is safe, easy to use, and not addictive. Anyone can be trained to save a life. NALOXONE: (also called Narcan®) is a prescription medicine that can stop an overdose. Parents, relatives and friends can get it and give it to someone who is overdosing on heroin or other drugs like OxyContin® or Percocet®. Baltimore City community members are encouraged to attend public trainings to learn how to recognize and respond to an opioid overdose. These trainings are designed for anyone who thinks they may be near someone experiencing an overdose.

Instructor Bio:

Harriet Smith & Ami Mange

Baltimore Harm Reduction Coalition

Additional Resources:

http://baltimoreharmreduction.org/oend/

Check out: http://health.baltimorecity.gov/opioid-overdose/baltimore-city-overdose-prevention-and-response-information and http://dontdie.org/ for more information!