GEOLOOM: Cultural Mapping in Baltimore

The GEOLOOM map is an online mapping tool that demonstrates how arts and culture is woven into Baltimore’s neighborhoods and social fabric. The tool is intended for a wide audience, including arts and culture organizations, urban planners, non-profits, researchers, community associations, activists, developers, and residents. This workshop will help attendees navigate the GEOLOOM map as well as demonstrate how the tool can be a resource for communities and the city of Baltimore.

Location
Maryland Institute College of Art
Instructor
Christine Hwang
Part of
August Workshops November 4 Knowledge Exchange Day
Sessions
Tuesday, August 29, 2017 6:00 - 7:00 PM
Saturday, November 4, 2017 3:00 - 4:00 PM
Course is full
 
 

The GEOLOOM map is an online mapping tool that demonstrates how arts and culture is woven into Baltimore’s neighborhoods and social fabric. The goal of the GEOLOOM map is to insure that every Baltimore community receives the attention and support needed to establish and maintain livability throughout the city.

The tool is intended for a wide audience, including arts and culture organizations, urban planners, non-profits, researchers, community associations, activists, developers, and residents. GEOLOOM allows users to gain a better understanding of the arts and culture landscape along with the ability to view data within a broader context of demographic, real estate, and ecological information.

Through visualization, GEOLOOM will aid cultural institutions, businesses, and elected officials by heightening their awareness of potential audiences, customers, and constituents. To learn more about the tool and its development, please visit: http://bniajfi.org/currentprojects/cultural-mapping-tool. To explore the tool, please visit geoloom.org.

This workshop will help attendees navigate the GEOLOOM map as well as demonstrate how the tool can be a resource for communities and the city of Baltimore. The workshop will demonstrate different ways residents and community organizations can add their own arts and culture data, such as information about community events, public art, and historic sites, to the GEOLOOM map. This allows communities to self-define what they consider arts and culture and, in turn, show both what brings neighborhoods together and makes them unique.